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School of Arts, Histories and Cultures
Whitworth Art Gallery
The Whitworth Art Gallery hosts exhibitions on modern and contemporary art and holds a prestigious collection of fine and applied arts from late classical times onwards.

Resources & Facilities

The teaching and research in Art History and Visual Studies are supported by a specialist collection of 350,000 slides, a digital image archive, and major library, gallery and museum including the main John Rylands University Library, the Deansgate branch of which houses one of the world's finest collections of medieval illuminated books and the University's extensive collections of manuscripts and rare books; the Whitworth Art Gallery, which hosts exhibitions on modern and contemporary art and holds a prestigious collection of fine and applied arts from late classical times onwards; the Manchester Museum, with its outstanding collections of ethnographic, Classical and other ancient artefacts; the highly touted Contact Theatre and the Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama, which both host theatrical and performance art events; the exceptional collection of English pictures of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries at Tabley House.

And, in the adjacent city centre, the Manchester City Art Gallery, with its internationally famous Pre- Raphaelite collection; the Lowry Arts Centre in nearby Salford; the Imperial War Museum North; the Cornerhouse galleries and cinemas; and Urbis, a museum of urban life. Students at Manchester also draw upon the resources of Liverpool (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool Museum, Tate Gallery) and Leeds (Henry Moore Institute).

The main library provision is the John Rylands University Library, one of the finest university libraries in Britain. Its outstanding collections have been built up over many years and there is generous funding for current books, periodicals and information technology.

Art History and Visual Studies has been taught here for many years. Our Slide Library, a valuable resource for staff and students alike, contains over 350,000 slides, as well as videos and CD-Roms. Work has commenced on a digitization project of slides in conjunction with undergraduate teaching. Our students are fortunate to be able to make use of the in-house art history and archaeology library, a branch of the University Library, which provides extra copies of frequently used textbooks and photocopied material made available by individual lecturers for specific courses.

The teaching rooms, slide collection and library/reading room are situated in the Mansfield Cooper Building, a pleasant building with its own café.

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